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Jessica Marrone Parkes and Jackie Schatell

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Letters to the Editor

Where Are They Now?!

LHS Grads’ Dream Comes True

MANHATTAN, NY - Marc Jarman, 45, (LHS Class of ’87), had a once in a lifetime experience on March 9— he met his favorite athlete Roger Federer, played tennis with World #11 Grigor Di...

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Exceptional Kids

Burnet Hill Fifth Grader is the North Jersey Elementary School Winner of the “New Jersey Enthusiastic Reader Award”

WAYNE, NJ - On March 14, Meadow Geltzeiler, a fifth grader at Burnet Elementary School in Livingston, received the “New Jersey Enthusiastic Reader Award” at the New Jersey Associatio...

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Community Announcements

Today's Events

Police Blotter

Livingston Police Department Conducts Two Investigations Involving Motor Vehicles

March 27, 2015

LIVINGSTON, NJ — According to the Livingston Police Department, two instances involving vehicles were reported during the week of March 21 through March 27. A Livingston resident&rsquo...

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Municipal Court News

East Orange Woman Charged with Credit Card Theft with Intent to Use

March 18, 2015

LIVINGSTON, NJ — The Livingston Municipal Court has charged East Orange Resident Myeisha Sturdivant, a Party City employee, with credit card fraud. The charge, originally amended to theft,...

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Press Releases

Columns

Admit U to College

Special Announcement: Admit U Consulting Now Offering Tutoring Services

Melanie and the Admit U Consulting team are excited to announce our latest business venture—our services are expanding to provide students with comprehensive college planning all under one...

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Livingston Community Corner

Livingston Students Win Awards for Research Projects

LIVINGSTON, NJ - Livingston Public Schools has announced that two of Livingston’s Science Research students attended the North Jersey Regional Science Fair (NJRSF) competition over the wee...

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Y Works

Premier of Newly-Renovated Rosen PAC Features Performance by Aztec Two-Step Performing Simon and Garfunkel Songbook on May 2

WAYNE, NJ - The newly-renovated Rosen Performing Arts Center at the Wayne YMCA will make its debut May 2 as the Rosen PAC welcomes folk-rock duo Aztec Two-Step performing “The Simon & ...

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CPA Q&A

Robert J. Blackwell, CPA/PFS/CGMA

Robert J. Blackwell, CPA/PFS/CGMA is a senior member of Levine, Jacobs & Company, LLC. He provides accounting, tax and consulting services for a diverse client base of individuals and closel...

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Sobel Solutions

Dress For Success to Honor Sobel & Co.'s Michael LaForge at 2015 Gala

LIVINGSTON, NJ – For the first time ever, Dress for Success (DFS) of Morris County, a not-for-profit organization that promotes economic independence for women in need of support, has chos...

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Golda Och Academy Corner

Seventh-Grade Students Apply Judaic Lessons to Golda Och Academy's Annual Tzedakah Fair

WEST ORANGE, NJ - Golda Och Academy’s seventh-graders participated in the annual Tzedakah Fair on March 17, showcasing their multimedia projects on charitable organizations for parents, fa...

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Discount Travel News

A Week in San Diego for $474

This week’s gem, The Gaslamp Plaza Suites is a historical, European style hotel built in 1913, and listed in the National Registry of Historic Places. As you walk in, observe the plaza...

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Real Estate

Science Research Wins National Distinction

By LIVINGSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

January 24, 2013 at 9:32 PM

Two Livingston High School seniors – Krishan Kania and  Alexander Nie – won semifinalists honors in the national Intel Science Talent Search (STS) for their research projects that could optimize the healing process and lead to better cancer diagnosis.
 
Intel is the nation's oldest competition for teenage researchers, bringing together the best and brightest young scientific minds. Kania and Nie will receive a $1,000 award from the Intel Foundation. LHS will also receive an additional $2,000 from the foundation for the achievements of its two semi-finalists.  
 
The LHS students join a distinguished list of student researchers. Alumni of STS have made extraordinary contributions to science and hold more than 100 of the world's most coveted science and math honors, including seven Nobel Prizes and four National Medals of Science.
 
Kania’s project, titled, “Making an IMPACT: Advancing the Computation of Next-Generation Sequencing Data,” involved the creation of a computer program that has now been packaged into a larger software called "IMPACT" (Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets).  The project has been published in three academic journals in the field of bioinformatics.  In addition to Intel, Kana was named a semi-finalist in the Siemens Competition in October.

"Traditionally, we think of cancer in terms of its location: lung, pancreas, etc. However, with the quantitative background of the scientists involved in The Cancer Genome Atlas and my mentors at the Berger lab in Sloan-Kettering, cancer is starting to be described in terms of genomics, on the resolution of DNA,” Kania explained. “IMPACT (Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets) refers to one assay that has adopted DNA sequencing technology to better diagnosis cancer patients.”
 
“Each sequencing assay differs from one another due to a number of methods generally categorized as library preparation, sequencing, and data analysis.  Projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas have developed assays designed to study common cancer types from high profile tissue,” he said. “IMPACT, however, recognizes that truly personalized cancer medicine will come from assays that can make strong conclusions, but with lower quality, and more clinically feasible, tissue specimens.  Experimental techniques of IMPACT have addressed this well, but there is still much to be resolved computationally.  For personalized cancer medicine, investigators will need a computational methodology that promises speed and confidence, two important necessities for effective patient care.”
 
“With this in mind, I developed a computer program, which has been implemented in assays such as IMPACT, to more efficiently analyze next-generation sequencing data from cancer tissues.  The results of this project can be best summarized as a program that performs 568 times as fast as the traditional methodologies, while presenting more informative and developed metrics.  When implemented into IMPACT, this program is part of the collective effort to produce better outcomes in cancer patients, and make cancer a more manageable disease."
 
Nie examined “Gelatin Hydrogels as a Cellular Scaffold: The Effect of Glucose on Gel Structure and Fibroblast Behavior.”

“My project studied the effects of glucose, a simple sugar, on hydrogels made of gelatin, a material derived from animal tissue,” he explained. “Specifically, my project analyzed the gel's hardness, surface features, and ability to promote cell growth and migration. Overall, I found that optimal hydrogels have glucose concentrations near normal blood sugar levels (2mg/mL). At 2mg/ml, the sugar not only strengthens the gel, but also promotes cell growth and migration. Therefore, hydrogels used in cell delivery should mimic the body's blood sugar levels to optimize the healing process.”

“We at Livingston High School are very proud of both Kris and Alex.  Both of these young men continue to challenge themselves with rigorous schedules and participation in numerous science clubs, competitions and summer experiences,” said Brian Carey, Chairman of the LHS Science Department and Director of Science Research.

“Kris and Alex both sought out opportunities to further their science and research knowledge and skills this past summer and their hard work has clearly paid off,” Carey said.

The Intel STS recognizes 300 students and their schools as semifinalists each year. From that select pool, 40 finalists are then invited to Washington, DC, undergo final judging, display their work to the public, meet with notable scientists, and compete for the top award of $100,000.